English English English Türkçe (Türkiye) Türkçe (Türkiye) italiano (Italia) italiano (Italia) español (España) español (España) français (France) français (France) polski (Polska) polski (Polska) svenska (Sverige) svenska (Sverige) srpski (latinica, Crna Gora) srpski (latinica, Crna Gora) Deutsch (Deutschland) Deutsch (Deutschland) Nederlands (Nederland) Nederlands (Nederland) suomi (Suomi) suomi (Suomi) hrvatski (Hrvatska) hrvatski (Hrvatska) српски српски lietuvių (Lietuva) lietuvių (Lietuva) latviešu (Latvija) latviešu (Latvija) español (México) español (México) English (Malta) English (Malta) български български
Green Motion Car and Van Rental Locations Franchise / Affiliate Terms and Conditions Contact Book Now

About

Environmental Policy Social and Corporate Responsibility Green Heart Donation Giving Back Careers Our Fleet Electric Vehicles

Loyalty

Green Silver Gold VIP

Multi-Product

Basic Plus+ Premium Premium+

Locations

Turkey South Africa United Kingdom View all

Blogs

News

New locations Awards Environmental News View all

Cool Motion

COVID-19

Corporate

Toggle Menu

Autonomous cars to communicate with human drivers

Volvo has developed a system which will allow fully autonomous vehicles to communicate their intentions with human drivers to improve road safety.

It uses a combination of external sounds, colours, visuals and movements to signal to drivers what the vehicle is going to do and aims to help maximise the technology’s potential to reduce collisions.

The manufacturer developed the system as part of its 360c autonomous concept to be a universally applicable standard so other road users do not have to consider the make or brand of individual autonomous cars,

Malin Ekholm, vice-president at the Volvo Cars Safety Centre, said: “We strongly believe this communication method should be a universal standard, so all road users can communicate easily with any autonomous car, regardless of which maker built it.

“But it is also important that we do not instruct others what to do next, in order to avoid potential confusion.

“Our research shows this is the safest way for fully autonomous cars to communicate with other road users.”